Green Card

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Important Reasons to Consider Green Card

Having a Green Card (officially known as a Permanent Resident Card allows you to live and work permanently in the United States. The steps you must take to apply for a Green Card will vary depending on your individual situation.

Green Card Processes and Procedures

  • Adjustment of Status
  • Consular Processing
  • Concurrent Filing
  • Travel Documents
  • Employment Authorization Document
  • Removing Conditions on Your Two-Year Green Card

Green Card Through Family

  • An immediate relative of a U.S. citizen

- Spouse of a U.S. citizen

- Unmarried child under the age of 21

- Parent of a U.S. citizen who is at least 21


  • Another relative of a U.S. citizen or relative of a lawful permanent resident under the family-based preference categories


  • Fiancé(e) of a U.S. citizen or the fiancé(e)’s child

- A person admitted to the U.S. as a fiancé(e) of a U.S. citizen (K-1 nonimmigrant)

- A person admitted to the U.S. as the child of a fiancé(e) of a U.S. citizen (K-2 nonimmigrant)


  • Widow(er) of a U.S. citizen

Widow or widower of a U.S. citizen and you were married to your U.S. citizen spouse at the time your spouse died


  • VAWA self-petitioner– victim of battery or extreme cruelty

- Abused spouse of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident

- Abused child (unmarried and under 21 years old) of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident

- Abused parent of a U.S. citizen

Green Card as a Special Immigrant

  • Religious Worker
  • Special Immigrant Juvenile
  • Afghanistan or Iraq national

Green Card through Other Categories

  • Asylee

- If you were granted asylum status at least 1 year ago

  • Refugee

- If you were granted asylee status at least 1 year ago

  • Registry
  • Human Trafficking Victim (T-Visa)
  • Crime Victim (U-Visa)
  • An abused (victim of battery or extreme cruelty) spouse or child under the Cuban Adjustment Act
  • An abused (victim of battery or extreme cruelty) spouse or child under Haitian Refugee Immigrant Fairness Act (HRIFA)